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Risk Management Blog

Get a read on risk.

There are many blogs out there, so what makes ours so special? Quite simply, if you want to deepen your understanding of risk management, every article herein will be worth your attention.

Designed by our experts to offer practical tips and techniques to elevate risk management and its influence on an organization’s performance; this is good stuff. And because we all know that data is the new gold, you’ll find plenty of insight into capturing and leveraging risk data to your organization’s advantage.

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3 Steps You Must Take TODAY to Reduce Your Software Risks

Kit Merker has been in technical and management roles for over a decade, doing everything from project management, coding, design, testing, and running a service. He currently works at Microsoft as a Developer Evangelist. Kit Merker has a blog dedicated to preparing for software disasters. Be sure to follow Kit on Twitter after reading his guest blog post below! 
These are times of economic uncertainty for many businesses, and the very idea of spending much-needed funds on something that might happen may seem like suicide. According to CIO.com,  business continuity & disaster recovery is NOT a top priority for CIO's.
 

It's a normal human tendency to stay optimistic and believe that you are immune from disaster. We say, "that'll happen to other people, I'll hope for the best and focus on my day-to-day activities."

But, as I say probably too frequently, hope is not a strategy.
Imagine if a disaster hit and you sustained serious downtime, got hacked, or lost data your customers needed. The results would be disastrous for your reputation and could mean the end of your business. You'd be kicking yourself for not preparing.
But just like a teenager learning to drive, sometimes getting in an accident helps you learn to operate more safely. The good news is that there are practical things you can do to reduce your risks of software disaster.

Data Analysis Steps for Risk Managers

Data analysis can help predict the outcome of a situation or allow you to protect your organization against risk. As discussed in a previous blog post, analysis has many benefits including mitigating repetitive losses, lowering insurance premiums, and more.

We recognize that data analysis can be difficult, particularly for organizations with a lot of data and complex processes. In fact, an estimated 75% of organizations lack the technology or strategy to effectively use their data. That’s why we came up with this simple guide on the steps for data analysis.

Why All Risk Managers Should Use Data Analytics

In a previous blog post, we discussed the importance of storing data and the value it can bring to any organization. Now, we’re going to talk about the next step in using data: analytics.

Analytics turn your data from useful to extremely effective and allow you to make changes that will benefit your organization as a whole. A survey by Deloitte found that 55% of organizations believe that analysis improves the organization's competitive position and 96% agree that it will continue to become more important over the next three years. Risk managers should utilize data analytics as they allow you to:

6 Reasons Data Is Key for Risk Management

An average organization only uses 50% of their available data for decision-making. This is significant when you consider 70% of late adopters base their decisions on gut feeling or experience, while 60% of best-in-class companies use data analytics when making decisions.

Data is powerful when used to its full capability; by using all available data, an organization can establish a clear competitive advantage. Storing and regularly accessing relevant information will allow your organization to save time and money while drastically improving decision quality. Below are some of the key benefits that data utilization can have on your organization.

Risk Assessment Example: What You Should Look For

 
A risk assessment example  is an essential step you must consider when devising protection and security policies for your business as well as your workers. The risk assessment example might also cover the to-do list to stay in compliance with laws and legislation.
 
The need for the risk assessment example is simple enough. It helps you prioritize the risks that really pertain to your business, in other words, the vulnerabilities that can cause real harm to the continuity and success of your business

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